You are currently browsing the monthly archive for March 2010.

The main season for graduate recruitment in Australia is here. I know this because I am starting to get requests for assistance with filling in graduate application forms. Between March and April, many of the large graduate employers are open for graduate applications. Click here to find the closing dates for a number of significant 2011 graduate programs. For example, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade closes on 22nd March, Centrelink on 27th April, and Commonwealth Bank on 7th April. If you want more details about the major graduate employers in Australia, visit Career Fairs or Grad Connection.

To give you some idea of what you will need to address in an application, the following questions are asked in the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade graduate application form.

Question 1: Qualifications and knowledge Why are you applying for the Graduate Trainee program in the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade? What skills and attributes would you be able to contribute to DFAT’s goals and work? You should give examples based on your academic achievements, work experience and/or extracurricular activities.

Question 2: Written and oral communication skills Provide examples of where your written and oral communication and negotiation skills have been most effective in the workplace or elsewhere. What outcomes were achieved?

Question 3: Conceptual and analytical skills  Describe a situation in which you have had to identify and analyse a problem or issue and then recommend a solution. How did you go about the task? What was the outcome? What constraints did you face in developing the solution?

Question 4: Effective working relations  What makes you an effective team member? How do you respond to problems or conflict within a team? Give an example of how you have contributed to a team’s achievements.

Question 5: Flexibility, adaptability and initiative  Give an example of where you have taken on an unfamiliar task or faced a challenge, whether in the workplace, your studies or extra-curricular activities. Describe how you prepared for and took on that task or challenge. What did you find most difficult about the experience?

If you are applying for a graduate role in the Commonwealth Bank, be prepared to answer the following:

 • Select up to two business unit program preferences. Please tell us why we should consider you for your first preference.

• Please tell us why we should consider you for your second preference.

• Please tell us about the extracurricular activities you have been involved in.

• Why have you chosen the Commonwealth Bank group as a potential future employer?

Why do you think the Commonwealth Bank graduate program aligns with your career goals?

• What does good customer service mean to you?

• Did you attend a Career Fair? Please specify at which Careers Fair you spoke with a Commonwealth Bank representative

• Did you attend a Commonwealth Bank campus presentation? Which campus presentation did you attend?

• Are you a member of a university or industrial society? • What was the main factor that influenced you to apply for the, Commonwealth Bank graduate program?

 Some Tips for completing a Graduate Application Form:

• remember that in these programs employers are not just offering a job. They hope you will grow into one of their future leaders.

 • while employers understand that graduates will apply for a number of organisations, they will be expecting that you are genuinely motivated to work for them. Therefore, you need to research the company or government agency and to make sure you match your achievements, interests and skills to how you can add most value to that employer.

 • it will take time to write good responses for the application form. So set aside quality time, draft your responses in Word, and get someone to proof read your answers before you transfer them across to the online application form.

• start by brainstorming all of your experience, knowledge and achievements – in your studies (individual and group assignments), work, voluntary and community activities. Try to use a different example to highlight your claims for each question.

• talk to people that you respect and get their ideas on what they see as your achievements and strengths. I find that most people overlook significant achievements.

 • it is okay to seek professional help with the writing of responses for your application form, you will not be the only person who does this. However you need to feel that the end result truly represents and matches how you will present to an assessment committee.

• be honest, as the application form is just the start of the selection process. If you overstate your claims you will need to live up to this in the interviews and other assessment processes.

• if you are stuck for the right words to use to fully present your case, you can access free online information, borrow books on selection criteria from the University or Council libraries, or purchase books written about addressing selection criteria. Just make sure that you access contemporary information.

 The good news is that new research by Graduate Careers Australia (GCA) shows 21 per cent of employers will increase the scale of their graduate programs in 2010.

Good luck with your application.

For more tips on answering graduate questions – please subscribe to this blog (top left corner).

For expert assistance with preparing your application you can contact me at brisbanejobcoach@gmail.com  or ph 0403766812

Advertisements

If a candidate gets to the ‘Interview’ stage for a government job, they should expect to be interviewed by a panel (committee) of two or three people. Usually each of the panel members will ask questions and take notes during the interview. Sometimes there will be an extra person in the room who has the role of scribe/selection support. The scribe will take detailed notes throughout the interview. When the candidate has left the interview, the selection panel will discuss responses to the questions and decide how well the candidate meets the selection criteria. The panel may use the notes that the scribe has taken to assist them to recall the candidate’s responses. The scribe will note the panel’s findings and at the end of all of the interviews will draft a Selection Report. The Selection Report details each candidate’s performance against the criteria, and may include a comparison of the most highly ranked candidates.

In some interviews, the scribe has solely a recoding role, and the committee fully details exactly what the scribe is to write. In most cases, the scribe will be a person with considerable HR/recruitment experience, and may provide significant advice and support to the selection committee (especially an inexperienced selection panel).

As the scribe is not directly involved in the interview process, candidates do not need to maintain the same level of eye contact with them as with the selection panel. However, it is important that candidates show appropriate interpersonal skills by greeting and farwelling the scribe politely.

***********************************************************************************

Employers – Please contact me if you need information about how to engage a selection scribe.

ph 0403766812    or      brisbanejobcoach@gmail.com 

***********************************************************************************

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 92 other followers

Employers- Please contact me about doing job application training for groups at your workplace. ph 0403766812 or brisbanejobcoach@gmail.com

Find me at CAMILLS59 on SlideShare

Find me on Twitter -ApplyingforaJob